Get Ready for Your Comeback Story

Whether we like it or not, success doesn’t happen overnight. It also doesn't come without many obstacles, challenges, setbacks and unfortunately often times a lot of rejection. In fact, some of the world’s most famous high achievers heard "no" quite a few times before getting that all-important “yes”!

What helps a business become successful is its ability to to comeback after being faced with difficult times, like oh let's say an unprecedented pandemic.

Founder, Lisa Shapiro with Founding Member, DeDee Cai at the Fempreneur Mastermind Reception.

Many of us are just starting to emerge from our mandated stay-at-home order with some essential businesses starting to reopen. We are starting to ramp up our businesses after a month or two pause or pivot to adjust to a new normal, including us at DCfempreneur!

March and April were busy for all us and we hosted many virtual meetups, workshops and get-togethers. May and June were a lot more quiet, although in May the Fempreneur Grow & Connect Challenge was a huge hit! The month of June flew by, but it was spent productively working behind the scenes to begin some unprecedented planning for future programming.

In July and upcoming months, DCfempreneur Members will have more opportunities to be highly visible, the chance to tell your story, and talk more about your pain points and how the community can provide support.

For the month of July, as an exclusive Member benefit, DCfempreneur Founding and Fempreneur Business Advocate (FAB) Members will have the opportunity to be in the LIMELIGHT for the day in our Facebook group to showcase their business, tell their story and connect with others in the community with our new Member Spotlights!
Not a member, yet? Check out our membership page.

What better way to kick off your comeback than to put yourself out there. It’s always the hardest part, especially during a comeback. People hate “starting over” but we can focus on the opportunity ahead, not the past.

This entire month we will be talking about the concept of "A Comeback" while sharing insight into those who kept going and made it, tips from experts about how to learn from a mistake, failure, and addressing what we often need to feel supported in our business.

Member Spotlight 2

Whether you’re powering through challenging times or revamping your business model, here are a few sensational comeback stories, that prove that the best way to face failure is to just keep going and don't give up!

“You just can’t beat the person who never gives up.” — Babe Ruth
“You just can’t beat the person who never gives up.” — Babe Ruth

J.K. Rowling

Just five years before publishing one of the most influential books of the 21st century, J.K. Rowling was living on welfare and struggling as a single mother. Her rags to riches story serves as an inspiration to many.

Rowling wrote the first book in the Harry Potter series while working during the night as a teacher, but the manuscript was rejected 12 times by publishers.

When Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone got published, Rowling was advised not to quit her day job since her chance of success was slim. Little did they know that there would be more than 450 million+ books sold worldwide, and we all know how that really turned out!

When invited to give a commencement speech to Harvard graduates in 2008, she conveyed the lessons she learned the hard way: appreciate the value of failing and recognize the importance of imagination.

It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all, in which case, you fail by default. - J.K. Rowlking

"It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all, in which case, you fail by default." - J.K. Rowling

 

R.H. Macy

Rowland Hussey Macy began his career as an entrepreneur in 1843, opening four failed retail stores in Massachusetts. It wasn’t until Macy tried again fifteen years later in New York that he found success — modestly at first. He opened the first R.H. Macy & Co. on the corner of 14th Street and 6th Avenue in New York City, then a low-rent district. On his first day, Macy’s made $11.08 (equivalent to $326.82 today). He made just $85,000 in sales that year.

Over the next several years, Macy’s expanded to occupy 11 adjacent buildings and opened new departments as it did so, effectively launching the modern department store. The interesting history about Macy's is its superior use of marketing, groundbreaking innovations and publicity to become one of the largest chains of department stores across the United States.

Historical Photos Source: http://blacksandalsa.blogspot.com/2013/12/macy-history.html
Historical Photos Source: http://blacksandalsa.blogspot.com/2013/12/macy-history.html

Steven Spielberg

Now one of the Hollywood’s most respected directors, Steven Spielberg was rejected from the University of Southern California School of Theater, Film and Television three times. But he didn’t let that stop him.

He eventually attended another school and secured an internship at Universal Studios. During that internship, he was asked to direct a small film, with his work impressing Universal executives so much that they offered him a seven-year contract. He became the youngest director ever hired by the studio and is now considered one of the founding pioneers of the New Hollywood era and one of the most popular and award-winning directors and producers in film history.

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Walt Disney

Before Walt Disney built the empire that has become his legacy today, he was fired by the Kansas City Star in 1919 because his editor said that "he lacked imagination and had no good ideas."

In 1921, Disney formed his first animation company in Kansas City, where he made a deal with a distribution company in New York. He had relative success but went bankrupt after acquiring too much debt and could not pay his rent. He reportedly survived by eating dog food.

When Disney first tried to get MGM studios to distribute Mickey Mouse in 1927, he was told that the idea would never work because a giant mouse on the screen would terrify women. It took Disney several other failures to finally become successful. Besides Mickey Mouse, Snow White was also dismissed by critics — until Disney proved them wrong.

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Even Elvis! After a performance at Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry, Elvis was told by the concert hall manager that he was better off returning to Memphis and driving trucks (his former career). There are hundreds of these examples including Oprah, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, all fired and told they'd never amount to anything. Oprah Winfrey was told she was "unfit for TV." Can you believe it?!

What if you could be like these others who experienced success despite multiple setbacks, overcome all the odds and crush your biggest goals? The reality is that you can do so much more than you imagine possible when you believe in yourself and are willing to put in the work. Take a few moments now to reflect on all the times you achieved the ‘impossible’.

This entire month we will be talking about the concept of "A Comeback" while sharing insight into those who kept going and made it, tips from experts about how to learn from a mistake, failure, and addressing what we often need to feel supported in our business. Are you ready for Your Comeback?! 

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